Eugenia Loli | Oh, L’amour

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Eugenia Loli is a Greek, California-based artist who creates images of love and passion by using collage and vintage images. Each of her works has a meaning and a story behind it, as she says in her biography:

“It’s important for me to “say” something with my artwork, so for the vast majority of my work there’s a meaning behind them. I usually do this via presenting a “narrative” scene in my collages, like there’s something bigger going on than what’s merely depicted. Sometimes the scene is witty or sarcastic, some times it’s horrific with a sense of danger or urgency, some times it’s chill. I leave it to the viewer’s imagination to fill-in the blanks of the story plot.”

You can buy her prints here.

Davide D’Elia | Antivegetativa

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Antivegetativa is the name of a thick anti-fouling paint used to cover old ships to prevent them from moulding. It basically kills any living form. This exhibition held at the Ex Elettrofonica gallery in Rome took over the whole exhibition space, “dipping” it into this beautiful blue colour. The walls, the floor but also the various objects (such as a chair and several paintings gathered from flea markets and old roman cellars) have all been covered by the blue paint. In his statement, Davide explains that he wants to experiment in stopping nature’s physicality as well as the passing of time.

(via Jealous Curator)

Jee Young Lee

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Jee Young Lee is a Korean artist who uses her studio to create these whimsical scenes. To do so, she doesn’t use any digital manipulation but instead she paints, makes and arranges the room to eventually take one single photo of it. Taking her inspiration from Korean tales and personal experiences, these self-portraits explore “her quest for an identity, her desires and her frame of mind”, according to OPIUM Gallery. Aren’t they poetic and beautiful? (via My Modern Met)