Elphick’s Preraphaelite muses

I may have missed the very promising exhibition The Pre-raphaelite Sisters at the National Portrait Gallery in London, what I did not miss though, is that:

a) its curator Jan Marsh has a blog where you can read about history of art, the making of an exhibition and other art-related subjects; and

b) I fell in love with artist Marina Elphick‘s work, discovered through Marsh’s blog.

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Elphick was showcased at the Preraphaelite Sisters conference at York, where she brought her own depictions of the famous Preraphaelite models made with fabric and thread. Her “muses” as she calls them, are skillfully crafted (look at the hair! look at the dresses!) and perfectly beautiful. But that’s not everything. Not only did she create these amazing figures, but she also collaged them into illustrations, photographs and paintings of their contemporaries, thus creating new artworks for us all to enjoy.

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Posing in picturesque landscapes and Victorian interiors, the muses are depicted as Elphick imagined their lives were. But she didn’t stop there either! On her website, she also shares the biographies of each of her muses, filled with details, portraits and anecdotes.

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The creative process Elphick went through to create this multifacted project resulted in a very aesthetically pleasing, dream-like world where her enigmatic figures evolve surrounded by art and history. *le sigh!*

The Haveit Collective

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The Haveit Collective is a team of four badass gals from Kosovo who have decided to speak against the inequalities and patriarchal society of their country. Their prime target? The Kanun, a bronze-age set of rules, still in place in nowadays Kosovo, that considers women as only fit for childbearing, and altogether, as second-class citizens.

Their live performances are usually held in the streets of Pristina, the capital, where they challenge the local community with visually striking actions in order to make people think and reflect on the established ways. For instance, on International Women’s Day, they took a copy of the Kanun and covered it with flour, beat it with a rolling pin and then deep-fried it.

Their performances are usually filmed or photographed and then published online, resulting in them receiving regular death threats from less open-minded folks. These threats, unfortunately treated lightly by the local police, only reinforced the Haveit collective’s desire to make things change.

(photography : Dardan Zhegrova, Agim Balaj)

 

Staying in with Chloe Joyce

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There is something very comforting about Chloe Joyce’s illustrations. Perhaps it is her use of somewhat muted colours in warm shades of pink and green, or perhaps it is because they show scenes of time spent in the intimacy of home. These private and cosy moments make me feel close to these women as I identify myself with them.

No need to say that I find these illustrations oh-so-lovely, and if you fancy seeing more of Chloe Joyce’s work –which I strongly recommend; you can do so via her website or her Etsy shop.

Lorien Stern

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Usually, sharks don’t really strike as the friendly type. But pair them with bright colours and they look much more fun, almost cute! Lorien Stern is the genius behind this idea, and creates shark heads in rainbow colours with ceramic and an obvious sense of humour. I really love those heads, and wouldn’t mind one or two in my living room!

(via Jealous Curator)

Fow Eating Skyr Photography | Lazzari Winter 2014 Lookbook

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I don’t know much about Fox Eating Skyr, except that they are a video and photography production company based in North Italy, and that they produced this beautiful series of photos for the Winter 2014 season of fashion brand Lazzari. I fell in love with these when I saw them in Frankie Magazine and they reminded me a bit of the aesthetics of Wes Anderson: frontal photographies, colourful shots and a touch of the 70s. Aren’t these just great?

(via Frankie)

Eugenia Loli | Oh, L’amour

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Eugenia Loli is a Greek, California-based artist who creates images of love and passion by using collage and vintage images. Each of her works has a meaning and a story behind it, as she says in her biography:

“It’s important for me to “say” something with my artwork, so for the vast majority of my work there’s a meaning behind them. I usually do this via presenting a “narrative” scene in my collages, like there’s something bigger going on than what’s merely depicted. Sometimes the scene is witty or sarcastic, some times it’s horrific with a sense of danger or urgency, some times it’s chill. I leave it to the viewer’s imagination to fill-in the blanks of the story plot.”

You can buy her prints here.

Davide D’Elia | Antivegetativa

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Antivegetativa is the name of a thick anti-fouling paint used to cover old ships to prevent them from moulding. It basically kills any living form. This exhibition held at the Ex Elettrofonica gallery in Rome took over the whole exhibition space, “dipping” it into this beautiful blue colour. The walls, the floor but also the various objects (such as a chair and several paintings gathered from flea markets and old roman cellars) have all been covered by the blue paint. In his statement, Davide explains that he wants to experiment in stopping nature’s physicality as well as the passing of time.

(via Jealous Curator)