Elphick’s Preraphaelite muses

I may have missed the very promising exhibition The Pre-raphaelite Sisters at the National Portrait Gallery in London, what I did not miss though, is that:

a) its curator Jan Marsh has a blog where you can read about history of art, the making of an exhibition and other art-related subjects; and

b) I fell in love with artist Marina Elphick‘s work, discovered through Marsh’s blog.

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Elphick was showcased at the Preraphaelite Sisters conference at York, where she brought her own depictions of the famous Preraphaelite models made with fabric and thread. Her “muses” as she calls them, are skillfully crafted (look at the hair! look at the dresses!) and perfectly beautiful. But that’s not everything. Not only did she create these amazing figures, but she also collaged them into illustrations, photographs and paintings of their contemporaries, thus creating new artworks for us all to enjoy.

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Posing in picturesque landscapes and Victorian interiors, the muses are depicted as Elphick imagined their lives were. But she didn’t stop there either! On her website, she also shares the biographies of each of her muses, filled with details, portraits and anecdotes.

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The creative process Elphick went through to create this multifacted project resulted in a very aesthetically pleasing, dream-like world where her enigmatic figures evolve surrounded by art and history. *le sigh!*

Lorien Stern

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Usually, sharks don’t really strike as the friendly type. But pair them with bright colours and they look much more fun, almost cute! Lorien Stern is the genius behind this idea, and creates shark heads in rainbow colours with ceramic and an obvious sense of humour. I really love those heads, and wouldn’t mind one or two in my living room!

(via Jealous Curator)

ReCheng Tsang

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ReCheng Tsang is a California-based artist who creates wall panels using porcelain. She usually leaves it unglazed so the viewer can focus on the shape and sensuality of each piece of porcelain. Each artwork is composed of hundreds and sometimes thousands of pieces of porcelain, each shaped by hand. The artist is interested in the dichotomous between “the porcelain’s hardness and permanence, and the resulting work which appears to be delicate, ephemeral and in motion”.

(via The Jealous Curator)

Diana Beltran Herrera | Bird Stamps

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Diana Bertrand Herrera is a Colombian artist who enjoys creating birds out of paper. For this series, she recreated some of the stamps she has been collecting for two years. The birds have been magnified and appear to be coming out of the stamps. Using a 3D technique, she has been working on every detail of each stamp to make these delicate works of art.

(via My Modern Met)